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Babies Count was first created in 1995 and is the only national database in the US to collect epidemiologic and demographic information on infants and toddlers between the ages of birth and 36 months who are blind or visually impaired. Information from this database has been used to make policy and budget decisions, to expand programs, to drive medical and educational research, and to track the changing face of blindness of children in our country today. The database is currently being reconstructed to reflect the ways that data is collected in the 21st century and to meet the evolving needs of participating agencies.

Source: Babies Count

Authors Perla and Ducret explain how the design of an O&M program for students with multiple disabilities should start with understanding the child's most basic needs, such as communication, safety, independence, and consistency.

Source: International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

Tips for parents on observing skills development, missing or delayed skills in children with visual impairments, and dealing with difficult or challenging behaviors.

Source: FamilyConnect

Three behavioral characteristics are commonly found among individuals with Congenital Rubella Syndrome. Author John Walters stresses the necessity of understanding the whole person and the function of behaviors before considering intervention.

Source: National Center on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

In your education of (and advocacy for) others, you may find these talking points helpful for getting the message across that orientation and mobility are important lifelong learning processes. This link presents both English and Spanish text.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and VIsually Impaired

In this 11-page document, Sam Morgan describes biobehavioral states and explains why they are important when working with students with profound disabilities.

Source: Hunter College

This article introduces two ways to classify states of awareness in "individuals with profound disabilities."  (This is a scanned document and is not accessible to screen readers.)

Overview of bioptic driving requirements, fitting and pricing, with state-by-state laws for bi-optic drivers in the United States.

The "Resources for Parents and Professionals" offers fact sheets with information on six common visual diagnoses, with specific information on eye specialists, vision assessments, effects of vision and behavior, common misconceptions. The Teaching Strategies section will be of particular interest to educators.

Information about blindness, education and development, independent movement and travel, sports, games, and leisure activities can be found on this site.

Blind Cool Tech is produced by computer users who are blind, and has everything from computers to house cleaning, including how to use software, find interesting websites and download MP3 files for free.

Rick Harmon manages the Geek Zone's lists of helpful resources, including "audio tutorials, gadget demonstrations, useful links and programs, and a community of tech gurus...."

This site features two newspaper articles about "small but significant breakthroughs" in science education for students who are blind: Camp Eureka, a natural history camp in Montana; and a dissection class at Colorado Center for the Blind.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Blind Sailing International is considered the governing body for competitive international sailing for persons who are blind or vision impaired. The Blind Sailing International's site offers general racing rules and boat information.

Source: Blind Sailing International

This link takes you directly to Chapter 30 of David Werner’s book, Disabled Village Children. with information about development, mobility, education, work, and social life, as well as vision, eye health, and prevention of blindness; also available in Spanish.

Source: Hesperian Foundation

Resources on various topics and services for individuals with vision impairment, legal blindness or deaf/blindness and intellectual disability.

Source: Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Links to data, maps, publications, and information about causes and socioeconomic aspects of blindness and visual impairment.

Source: World Health Organization (WHO)

"...[D]escribes the variety of state infrastructures and programs ... that serve children and youth who are blind or visually impaired. Information was collected through a brief survey distributed to all state education agencies...."  Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: National Association of State Director of Special Education, Inc. (NASDSE)

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