Visual Impairment and Blindness Resources

These resources cover the basics of visual impairment and blindness, covering the causes, as well as definitions of professional and medical terminology, descriptions of vision examination procedures, simulations, statistics, and recommendations for protecting the eyes and vision. This section also includes information on support groups for parents, families, and consumers, along with advice for environmental adaptations and tips for living with blindness and visual impairment.

For educational resources, please visit the sections grouped under Teaching Resources.

ABSF is committed to serving blind and visually impaired children and adults, giving them the opportunities and experiences that build confidence and independence that can last a lifetime.

Source: American Blind Skiing Foundation

The ACB "strives to increase the independence, security, equality of opportunity, and quality of life, for all blind and visually-impaired people.

Source: American Council of the Blind (ACB)
The Advocacy and Governmental Affairs staff of ACB (the American Council of the Blind) advocate on a wide variety of issues for people who are blind and visually impaired.  Efforts are focused on issues related to accessibility and health care, with information on legislative action, policy and more.
 
For more information, see: https://acb.org/content/advocacy
 

AFB provides a wealth of information and services to people who are blind or visually impaired, and their families, and for the professionals who serve them.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

AHA promotes therapeutic riding as a "treatment strategy … for people living with disabilities. Hippotherapy has been shown to improve muscle tone, balance, posture, coordination, motor development as well as emotional well-being."

Source: American Hippotherapy Association (AHA)

Basic description of nystagmus, FAQs, information for parents of school-age children with the condition.

The American Printing House for the Blind is the world's largest producer of books and products for people who are blind or visually impaired. Founded in 1858, APH is the official supplier of educational materials for visually impaired K-12 students in the U.S.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind

Based on data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); includes information on visual impairment.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Dr. Jan van Dijk describes his educational approach, including the topics of attachment and the development of communication.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness

Peruvian teachers describe the history of inclusive education in their country and identify some of its challenges.

Stacy Shafer outlines some of Dr. Lilli Nielsen's recommendations for designing a learning environment for a child with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2005, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

An interactive animated dictionary illustrating the workings of the human eye.

Source: LensShopper

Describes the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the human eye; includes graphics, photos, and information about medications.

Source: Ted M. Montgomery, O.D.

A listing of accessibility features on Android-compatible smartphones, with Settings information for customizing a device.

Information about aniridia and living with the condition.

APH maintains program statistics on children with visual impairments, including types of schools/programs in which they are educated, and their preferred learning medium (braille, print, auditory).

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

APH maintains program statistics on children with visual impairments, including types of schools/programs in which they are educated, and their preferred learning medium (braille, print, auditory).

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

Pages