Visual Impairment and Blindness Resources

These resources cover the basics of visual impairment and blindness, covering the causes, as well as definitions of professional and medical terminology, descriptions of vision examination procedures, simulations, statistics, and recommendations for protecting the eyes and vision. This section also includes information on support groups for parents, families, and consumers, along with advice for environmental adaptations and tips for living with blindness and visual impairment.

For educational resources, please visit the sections grouped under Teaching Resources.

Practical advice for organizing the kitchen, using appliances, pouring liquids, cooking, and setting the table; includes links to demonstration videos and online classes.

Source: Lighthouse International

ADA creates child-specific adaptations in a model workshop in New York City. They also create guidelines, techniques, and devices that can be replicated in Adaptive Design Centers all over the world. Founder Alex Truesdell is a MacArthur Fellow and tells about her work in this video: https://www.macfound.org/fellows/948/

Source: Adaptive Design Association

Aimed at professionals: understanding and assisting with the losses and adjustment stages that an adult encounters when experiencing vision loss.

Source: Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians

Age-related eye and vision conditions, driving safely after 60, and dealing with vision loss.

Source: American Optometric Association

Barbara Cheadle's child-rearing advice for parents whose children have visual impairments.

Source: Future Reflections, 2004, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

The American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) offers resources on advocacy for individuals who are blind or visually impaired. Resources are organized into the following categories:

  • Technology
  • Employment and Rehabilitation
  • Education
  • Civil Rights
  • Health
  • Policy Research

A non-governmental umbrella organization of agencies and associations that serve people in Africa who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: African Union of the Blind

This 190-page report describes "the experiences of youth with disabilities … in their first 2 years out of high school." Their findings indicated that "up to 2 years after leaving high school, almost 8 in 10 out-of-school youth with disabilities have been engaged in postsecondary education, paid employment, or training to prepare them for employment." Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: National Longitudinal Transition Study

A 10-page table that illustrates evidence-based practices that support implementation of in-school predictors of post-school success.

Source: NTACT

In this PowerPoint presentation, Dr. Mary Zatta talks about bringing a student's educational plan into alignment with state's curricular requirements, with specific examples from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

OSHA standards and procedures for protecting the eyes in the workplace.

Source: ISHN (Industrial Safety & Hygiene News)

Read the full page of resources here, and browse the links below for additional information specific to children who are blind or visually impaired, deafblind, or who have additional disabilities including visual impairment.

Source: Center for Parent Information and Resources (formerly NICHCY)

Definition of amblyopia, causes and treatment

Source: Prevent Blindness America

A program for children with visual impairments and additional disabilities shares its objectives, activities, methods, information on financial resources, and its impact on families; also in Spanish.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

Information for people with age-related macular degeneration, their families, caregivers, and professionals.

An introduction to age-related macular degeneration, with an overview of promising treatments and suggestions on living with the disease.

Source: Prevent Blindness America

AAAS publishes the journal Science, as well as other publications. They have a large number of programs designed to bring science literacy to all. They have resources for businesses, scientists, teachers, and students. One of their many endeavors, Project 2061 has developed highly regarded science curriculum benchmarks. The AAAS signature program is called Entrypoint, providing internship opportunities in science, engineering, math, computer science and some fields of business for students with disabilities. Many program alumni are now working in the science fields.

ABBA seeks to "promote interest in bowling activities among legally blind men and women in North America;" their newsletter is published three times per year and is available here in electronic format.

Source: American Blind Bowling Association

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