Multiple Disabilities Resources

In addition to blindness or visual impairment, a child may have additional disabilities, such as cognitive, developmental, hearing, or mobility impairments. Every student with multiple disabilities presents a unique educational challenge. Teachers need specialized training and skills to understand how these students experience and understand the world. In this section, families and educators will find introductions to the educational needs of these students, as well as best practice and policy overviews.

This site includes extensive information about sensory integration dysfunction, with sections focusing on education, classroom accommodations, and additional resources.

Source: Bridges4Kids

This PowerPoint presentation focuses on the learning styles of children with visual impairments with and without additional disabilities and on early orientation and mobility development.

Source: Provincial Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired (British Columbia)
SEE Adventure Camp
Nantahala Outdoor Center
Bryson City, North Carolina
 
Source: Camp Abilities
Headed by Erwin Borremans
 
Source: Camp Abilities
Headed by Brandon Schellhorn
Vinton, Iowa
(319)-472-5221
 
Source: Camp Abilities

Camp in Maine.

This online PDF book examines the effect of CP on the visual system and child development, with collaborative strategies for practitioners, educators, and families.

Source: Scottish Sensory Centre

Information about CHARGE Syndrome, including special resource packets for new parents and professionals, a one-page fact sheet, a list of frequently asked questions, a newsletter, information on medical management, and online resources.

In this webcast, Perkins School psychologist Pam Ryan outlines the features of CHARGE Syndrome and discusses how they affect a child’s learning and development.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

Tips for familiarizing a child with his or her environment from a wheelchair or stroller.

Source: FamilyConnect

The articles in this section offer a wealth of information on alternate methods of communication, including symbol systems, schedules, and sign language.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

These fact sheets inform parents on all aspects of communication. Each sheet defines the topic, explains its importance, and offers tips and important points to remember. Some are available in Spanish.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

This assessment tool is designed to pinpoint exactly how a child is currently communicating and to assist in creating communication goals. This user-friendly online version is aimed at parents whose children have severe multiple disabilities. Available in Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Korean, Vietnamese, and Czech.

A wide range of teaching strategies used to provide effective instruction to students with visual impairments and additional disabilities is presented in this collection of video webcasts. Includes reflections on touch, tangible symbols, and creating communications portfolios for students.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

When a child does not speak, many behaviors are a form of communication. This tip sheet reminds caregivers and educators of the basics. This landing page links to fact sheets in English, Chinese, Laotian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services (CDBS)

Sue Elan Holmes writes "about her experience with the Little Room, and what the Active Learning approach has meant for her son, Jimmy."

Source: Future Reflections, 2006, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Includes articles, bibliographies and Internet resources.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

CDBS's fact sheet provides specific strategies and activities that create a need for the child to communicate. This landing page links to fact sheets in English, Chinese, and Spanish.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services (CDBS)

Elizabeth Hartmann focuses on three main aspects of environments in this article (page 3): space, people, and time. Giving each appropriate attention "make them more conducive to meaningful communication" for children with deafblindness.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services

Information and resources on CVI, including videos, online classes, and information on the CVI Endorsement.

Source: Perkins eLearning

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