Family Resources

Having a family member who is blind or visually impaired can affect many areas of family life. Parents and relatives face a variety of challenges when making decisions about education, rehabilitation and other services. Older adults may want information on resources, tools, or ways to learn new skills they need to live independently. These websites for families include information on workshops, services, education, and many other resources.

The "Resources for Parents and Professionals" offers fact sheets with information on six common visual diagnoses, with specific information on eye specialists, vision assessments, effects of vision and behavior, common misconceptions. The Teaching Strategies section will be of particular interest to educators.

This site features two newspaper articles about "small but significant breakthroughs" in science education for students who are blind: Camp Eureka, a natural history camp in Montana; and a dissection class at Colorado Center for the Blind.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

This section of the AFB website includes resources for teachers of braille, resources for parents, a link to DOTS, the newsletter for braille literacy, and a listing of sources of braille materials.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Reproduced by Duxbury, Inc., world leader in software for braille and braille translation. These are print resources for students and teachers of braille.

Source: Duxbury Systems, Inc

The braille section of the Paths to Literacy site offers an overview, instructional strategies, pre-braille, tactile graphics, technology for braille readers, sources of print/braille books, tools for writing braille, braille production, and brailler repair. Users may post content, and there is also a forum for questions and answers related to braille literacy.

Source: Paths to Literacy

Helping your child with visual impairments under how nonverbal behavior and body language contribute to communication.

Source: Family Connect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

Camp Inter-Actions is a traditional summer camp experience for children who are blind or visually impaired.

Little Rock Foundation's annual summer camp for visually impaired and blind children

Source: YMCA

Camp in Maine.

Guidelines for making hospital stays as comfortable as possible for patients who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: Vision Australia

This self-guided tutorial compiles several presentations and addresses by parents of children who are visually impaired, and asks the viewer to consider what it means to families to be placed in this "ambassador" role.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

This site contains information on child development, including developmental screening and positive parenting tips.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

This page offers a sampling of toys and a list of tips to help parents select the best toys for children with blindness or visual impairments.

Source: WonderBaby

This list of common abbreviations may be helpful in interpreting an eye report.

Source: Root Eye Network

The articles in this section offer a wealth of information on alternate methods of communication, including symbol systems, schedules, and sign language.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

Project SALUTE describes the hierarchy of communication symbols, from most abstract to most concrete. Color photographs of each of the eleven symbols are included; available in English and Spanish.

Source: Project SALUTE

Project SPARKLE describes the three types of concepts (concrete, semi-concrete, and abstract) and general strategies to assist children who are deafblind in concept development; includes a glossary and links to resources.

Source: Project SPARKLE

Sue Elan Holmes writes "about her experience with the Little Room, and what the Active Learning approach has meant for her son, Jimmy."

Source: Future Reflections, 2006, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Elizabeth Hartmann focuses on three main aspects of environments in this article (page 3): space, people, and time. Giving each appropriate attention "make them more conducive to meaningful communication" for children with deafblindness.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services

This 3-page article (on pp.6-8 of the newsletter) offers strategies for planning an effective transition from school to adult life. It includes information about the members of the team and creating an effective futures plan.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services

Pages