Early Childhood Resources

Because a great deal of an infant's learning is through the visual mode, it's important to understand the effect of visual impairment on child development. Find out what types of intervention are most effective during these crucial formative years. Materials for older students can be found under the appropriate categories.

This section of the interactive website includes information about products and instructional materials for teaching science to students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins School for the Blind

In this webcast, Perkins science teacher Kate Fraser outlines teaching strategies and adaptations to make science lessons and activities accessible to students who are visually impaired. Find even more resources more at the Perkins Accessible Science website.

Source: Webcast, Perkins School for the Blind

This free online resource provides information about accessibility, education policy, and more.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

Aimed at parents, this page provides a brief overview of the challenges facing teenagers with visual impairment who are studying geography and history.

Source: Family Connect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

Martha Majors, of the Perkins Deafblind Program, defines literacy for students with blindness, deafblindness, or additional disabilities. and explores alignment of the curriculum with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: In Touch, 2008, New England Consortium of Deafblind Projects

"The AccessSTEM website is a space where K-12 teachers, postsecondary educators, and employers learn to make classroom and employment opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) accessible to individuals with disabilities, and share promising practices."

Adapted Curriculum Enhancement (ACE) seeks to provide research-based educational products and services for students with visual impairments.  Their website offers some hands-on activities on topics such as:

  • Spongy Universe
  • Dynamic Universe
  • Tracing Origins Thought Experiments
  • Feel the Impact

The materials include tactile files, audio files, and student text.

Acorn Naturalists offers a host of 3-D models appropriate for students with visual impairment.

 

The following is from the Acorn Naturalists website:

This site is filled with ideas and tools for planning your programs, enriching your curriculum, and getting children interested in science and nature. Acorn Naturalists' resources are designed to add depth, zest, and inspiration to your programs. This year, our 26th, we've added hundreds of new products, including replicas, hands-on activity kits, field equipment, interpretive tools, curricula, and other engaging resources.

Who we are...

Acorn Naturalists was started over a quarter century ago by two educators interested in developing and distributing high quality resources for the trail and classroom. The founders are still involved on a daily basis, working closely with a dedicated and informed staff. 

 

Dr. Bruce shares examples of action research studies that were conducted at Perkins School for the Blind.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

A project developed between Penrickton Center for the Blind in Michigan, Perkins School for the Blind, and the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired provides resources and a community of practice around the work of Dr. Lilli Nielsen and Active Learning. The site includes discussion of Active Learning principles, assessment, implementation, materials, equipment, and other events and resources. Active Learning is most effective for those with significant multiple disabilities and in the 0-48 month developmental level. 

This is an excerpt from Dr. Lilli Nielsen's book, Early Learning Step by Step. It outlines her Active Learning Approach and explains the importance of the learning environment for childen with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2004, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Chapter 5, “Activities for the Young Baby.” This chapter from the Hesperian Foundation book, Helping Children Who Are Blind, focuses on helping babies to trust people and their surroundings, respond to sounds, and develop motor skills.

Source: Hesperian Foundation

These activities integrate literacy into a preschooler's play, storytime, and daily activities.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Outlines Head Start policy and practice for accommodating and integrating children with disabilities into its programs.

Source: HeadStart

Evolving Universe and Feel the Impact are NASA astronomy modules adapted for students with visual impairments. Both include alternate student texts and tactile graphics cards. The SEE Project develops "Braille / tactile … space science activities and observing programs that actively engage blind and visually impaired students from elementary grades through introductory college level in space science."

Source: Initiative to Develop Education though Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS)

Physical education teachers learn what they "should keep in mind when working with a student with a visual impairment," including a list of instructional strategies and suggested modifications of the environment.

Source: PELinks4U

This site provides information about how to become an adapted physical education instructor, how IEPs are tied to Physical Education, the role of the adapted phys. ed. teacher, national standards and certification, and adapted physical education for students who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: PEteacherEDU.org

A range of resources can be found here, including general adaptations, assessment instruments, information for parents, products, and research.

Source: PE Central

APENS promotes the standards for adapted physical educators. This site contains information on Adapted Physical Education, including history and related links.

This webinar produced at Perkins explains specific aspects of environmental obstacles, with adaptation tips.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

Pages