Deafblindness Resources

These resources relate specifically to deafblindness (Scout also provides more general resources about multiple disabilities). Students who are deafblind have unique educational challenges, but there are also organizations, communities, and groups that focus on deafblindness. The resources here include material for parents, teachers, and individuals.

Causes of deafblindness, their symptoms and progression.

Source: Sense International (India)

Information about CHARGE Syndrome, including special resource packets for new parents and professionals, a one-page fact sheet, a list of frequently asked questions, a newsletter, information on medical management, and online resources.

In this webcast, Perkins School psychologist Pam Ryan outlines the features of CHARGE Syndrome and discusses how they affect a child’s learning and development.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

These fact sheets inform parents on all aspects of communication. Each sheet defines the topic, explains its importance, and offers tips and important points to remember. Some are available in Spanish.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

A wide range of teaching strategies used to provide effective instruction to students with visual impairments and additional disabilities is presented in this collection of video webcasts. Includes reflections on touch, tangible symbols, and creating communications portfolios for students.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

When a child does not speak, many behaviors are a form of communication. This tip sheet reminds caregivers and educators of the basics. This landing page links to fact sheets in English, Chinese, Laotian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services (CDBS)

Project SPARKLE describes the three types of concepts (concrete, semi-concrete, and abstract) and general strategies to assist children who are deafblind in concept development; includes a glossary and links to resources.

Source: Project SPARKLE

Author/educator Barbara Miles offers strategies for making connections with students who are deafblind, encouraging speakers to put the elements of conversation into a tactile mode.

Source: Perkins eLearning Webcasts

Includes articles, bibliographies and Internet resources.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

CDBS's fact sheet provides specific strategies and activities that create a need for the child to communicate. This landing page links to fact sheets in English, Chinese, and Spanish.

Source: California Deaf-Blind Services (CDBS)

This guide for service providers examines many aspects of deafblindness, including identification, assessment, communication, and services

Source: Sense

DbI brings together professionals, researchers, families, consumers, and administrators all around the world to raise awareness about deafblindness. The site includes articles on service guidelines, education issues, communication, and interpreting.

This factsheet lists the different categories of deafblindness experienced by older people and some of the challenges they face. Scroll through the list of Factsheets to download.

Source: Action on Hearing Loss

This fact sheet has been developed to guide families through the development of an individualized education program for a child with deafblindness. It is available as a free download, below, or hard copies can be bought at the link in the resource title. It references both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Deafblindness: Educational Service Guidelines . 

Expert Advice: Developed at Perkins, guide offers advice on working with your child’s team to develop an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Learn about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Deafblindness: Educational Service Guidelines.

Download a copy of the Developing an Effective IEP mini-guide in Spanish: Spanish (PDF)

Source: Perkins School for the Blind

Census data on the impact of disability on families. Visual and hearing impairments are counted together and not differentiated.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Disability statistics drawn from the 2000 Census. Visual and hearing impairments are counted together and not differentiated.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

The CEC's Division on Visual Impairment and Deafblindness advances the education of children and youth who have visual impairments or deafblindness. Browse selected articles and position papers here.

Source: Council for Exceptional Children

Features a weblog with updates on research and publications, and a forum of experts that respond to questions about education of children with deafblindness.

Karl R. White discusses the importance of early detection of hearing loss; available in English and Spanish.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

Pages