Teaching Resources

This page describes the book Touch the Sun, which allows blind and visually impaired students to experience images of the sun and solar activity by feeling transparent raised textures bonded to the pictures.

Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Accompanied by a one-hour video, this tutorial shows how to calculate optimum print size for a student, and discusses optical and non-optical methods of magnification. 1.5 CE or ACVREP credits available.

Source: Perkins eLearning (Tutorial/Webinar)

Parents can learn practical tips to help their babies with visual impairments develop normal sleep patterns.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

The joys of woodworking. Includes safety tips. 

Source: Vision Aware

Psychologist offers suggestions to address sleeping challenges for children who are blind or visually impaired in this video webcast

Source: Perkins School for the Blind, Perkins eLearning

Includes visual screening importance, guidelines, and procedures.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Descriptionkey.org provides guidelines for using descriptive language in educational materials.  

Source: DCMP (Described and Captioned Media Program)

This 42-page PDF manual is excellent for families, administrators, and general education teachers who need to understand how educational services are delivered to students with visual impairments 

Source: Virginia Department of Education

This handbook presents a step-by-step process for creating an accessible arts program for people with visual impairments. Each module contains an overview, practical considerations, agendas, checklists, troubleshooting tips and funding strategies.

Source: Art Beyond Sight Collaborative

This site describes Touch the Universe: A NASA Braille Book of Astronomy, which uses embossed images of planets, nebulae, stars, and galaxies to make it accessible to readers who are blind and visually impaired. The site includes released images, text, videos, Fast Facts, and related links.

Source: HubbleSite

Contains A-Z information on diseases and disorders of the eye, basic eye anatomy, and eye care resources; also available in Spanish.

Source: National Eye Institute (NEI)

The HEATH Resource Center is an online clearinghouse on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities offering information on educational disability support services, policies, procedures, adaptations, accessing college or university campuses, career-technical schools, and other postsecondary training entities.

Source: National Youth Transitions Center

This is a step-by-step guide to a technique to help your baby sleep independently for longer periods of time.

Source: WonderBaby.org

This article explores five reasons why a baby might not sleep. Some of these problems are experienced by all babies, some are specific to blind babies. Each sleep problem is accompanied by a sleep solution.

Source: WonderBaby.org

This article explains how learning about communication and language differs for a baby who is visually impaired, and offers suggestions for helping your child learn to communicate.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

This article has practical suggestions for parents of preschoolers for developing social skills.

Source: FamilyConnect

This article offers practical tips for helping a child to be more independent in the bathroom, including how to use unfamiliar bathrooms.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

O&M skills begin when a baby learns to balance and walk. Advice for enhancing confidence and development.

Source: FamilyConnect

This guide summarizes the various visual impairments a child will have after hemispherectomy, TPO disconnection, and occipital lobectomy, and how they can affect a child’s daily living, functional mobility, and access to the educational curriculum in school.

Source: Perkins eLearning

Highbrook Lodge is a traditional residential summer camp experience for adults, children and families who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: Cleveland Sight Center

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