Teaching Resources

AAAS publishes the journal Science, as well as other publications. They have a large number of programs designed to bring science literacy to all. They have resources for businesses, scientists, teachers, and students. One of their many endeavors, Project 2061 has developed highly regarded science curriculum benchmarks. The AAAS signature program is called Entrypoint, providing internship opportunities in science, engineering, math, computer science and some fields of business for students with disabilities. Many program alumni are now working in the science fields.

Basic description of nystagmus, FAQs, information for parents of school-age children with the condition.

Dr. Jan van Dijk describes his educational approach, including the topics of attachment and the development of communication.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness

Stacy Shafer outlines some of Dr. Lilli Nielsen's recommendations for designing a learning environment for a child with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2005, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Suggestions for creating tactile teaching aids, including clocks, a geometry kit, tactile maps, globe, chemical equation tiles, and more.

Source: Eyeway.org (India)

Ann Gelles shares a series of animal stories designed to teach contractions to beginning braille readers. "Students are introduced to … whole word contractions and short form words as they learn and practice the alphabet."

Source: California School for the Blind

The APH report was conducted in 2005-2006 to analyze mathematics research and studies that meet the criteria for evidence-based practice.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

The Quick Tips video series provides weekly ideas (under 5 minutes) for incorporating American Printing House for the Blind (APH) resources into your lessons. Bookmark this idea bank and visit often!

Source: American Printing House for the Blind

Susan Boswell and Debbie Gray outline the steps in toilet training, including assessment, physical structure, establishing a routine and communication system, and troubleshooting. A list of children's books about toilet training is included.

Source: Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication-Handicapped Children (TEACCH)

JAN has the answers to your questions about ADA regulations, workplace accommodations, advocacy and accessibility. JAN is a service of the Office of Disability Employment Policy, in the U.S. Department of Labor

Assessing vision as part of an early intervention program for infants and children who have additional or multiple disabilities and visual impairment (MDVI).

Source: Scottish Sensory Centre

Doris Willoughby offers specific ideas for the assessment of children with a visual impairment, including adaptations of existing instruments, as well as observation of the child in activities of daily living.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Find out the purpose of assessments and learn more about some of the different types.

Source: FamilyConnect

Validation studies conducted on assessment instruments specific to children with deafblindness are summarized, with recommendations and planning checklist.

Source: Oregon Health & Science University

The importance of understanding functional vision when selecting techniques for early intervention and classroom strategies.

Source: Lea-Test Ltd.

A 73-page handbook on the assessment of functional vision; includes advice on low vision training. Link also includes access to book 1, covering screening for impaired vision. 

Source: World Health Organization (WHO)

Focuses on communication and the interpreter's role when assessing the vision of a person who is deafblind; includes tests and techniques for conducting the assessment.

Source: Lea-Test Ltd.

In this 60-minute presentation Frances Mary D'Andrea addresses the importance of monitoring students’ progressive skills as they develop as readers and writers.

Source: Perkins eLearning Tutorial and Webinar

This one-hour webinar explores the role of the teacher of students with visual impairments (TVI) in reading and writing instruction, both as a collaborator with the general classroom teacher and as a provider of specific instruction. The importance of monitoring students’ progressive skills are emphasized, with specific approaches and tools for monitoring progress of students using braille. Also available as a self-paced tutorial.

Source: Perkins eLearning

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