Teaching Resources

In this five-page article, Cary A. Supalo and Thomas E. Mallouk describe inexpensive laboratory adaptations that increase accessibility to experiments and classroom exercises for students who are blind or visually impaired.

Using these practical suggestions will make historical site visits meaningful to students who are blind and visually impaired. Tactile representations, audio recordings, and the use of large print are discussed.

Source: English Heritage

Science instructor Sara Larkin uses lesson plans in magnetism, electricity, and sound to demonstrate how inquiry-based learning can be modified for students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

Outlines some principles that make tasks a bit easier.

Source: Vision Australia

Includes both Math and ELA (English/Language Arts). These frameworks are based on the same Maryland Common Core Curriculum Frameworks that were adopted by the State Board and include the identified braille skills and expectations at each grade level (Pre-kindergarten through grade 12) for students who read braille. The standards provide a clear roadmap of braille instruction for teachers and parents to improve literacy skills for students who read braille.

Source: School Improvement in Maryland

These links for teachers whose math students are blind or visually impaired include tips for classroom accommodations, advice for reading math aloud to students, and information about assistive technology.

Source: Equal Access to Software and Information (EASI)

Although not aimed at parents of children with visual impairments, this site has useful general information, including strategies for teaching big mathematical concepts, activities that reinforce math skills in the daily routine, and links to additional resources.

Source: U.S. Department of Education

International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI), Overbrook School for the Blind, and The Nippon Foundation collaborated on this teaching methods manual that includes use of the traditional abacus and Nemeth braille code.

Source: A Publication of ON-NET/ICEVI

Collection of videos includes abacus, calculators, low tech math tools, and Nemeth

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

New Visions offers information to professionals and parents working with infants and children with feeding, swallowing, oral-motor, and pre-speech problems.

Source: New Visions

In this webcast, Perkins Occupational Therapist Sue Shannon discusses the importance of mealtime skills in teaching social skills and concept development. Video demonstrations include many practical tips and helpful strategies; close-captioned, includes downloadable PowerPoint slides.

Source: Perkins School for the Blind, Perkins eLearning

Following this advice allows the guide dog to do its work safely.

Source: Guide Dogs for the Blind

The CEC takes an in-depth look at the implications of Common Core in terms of student characteristics, behaviors, and learning strategies.

Features to look for when selecting a microwave for a user who is blind or visually impaired.

Source: Vision Australia

This short checklist from DVI Quarterly was developed by educators "to determine the need for an orientation and mobility evaluation for a student with multiple impairments by a certified O&M specialist."

Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division on Visual Impairments (CECDVI)

Created by HGS Hinomoto Plastics of Japan, these kits will mature your molecular structure and chemical bond models beyond marshmallows and Tinker Toys.

Source: Tech Vision

Created by HGS Hinomoto Plastics of Japan, these kits will mature your molecular structure and chemical bond models beyond marshmallows and Tinker Toys.

Source: Tech Vision

The information in this section of the BCRC site is designed to help parents encourage movement in their young children who are blind.

Source: Blind Children's Resource Center

Ms. Whozit is an advice columnist in the NFB's Braille Monitor. She addresses questions from people with visual impairments on dealing with sighted people who are often thoughtless or rude. To find more columns, enter "Ms. Whozit" in the search field at the NFB website: www.nfb.org.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

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