Teaching Resources

Dr. Bruce shares examples of action research studies that were conducted at Perkins School for the Blind.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

A project developed between Penrickton Center for the Blind in Michigan, Perkins School for the Blind, and the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired provides resources and a community of practice around the work of Dr. Lilli Nielsen and Active Learning. The site includes discussion of Active Learning principles, assessment, implementation, materials, equipment, and other events and resources. Active Learning is most effective for those with significant multiple disabilities and in the 0-48 month developmental level. 

This is an excerpt from Dr. Lilli Nielsen's book, Early Learning Step by Step. It outlines her Active Learning Approach and explains the importance of the learning environment for childen with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2004, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Outlines Head Start policy and practice for accommodating and integrating children with disabilities into its programs.

Source: HeadStart

Evolving Universe and Feel the Impact are NASA astronomy modules adapted for students with visual impairments. Both include alternate student texts and tactile graphics cards. The SEE Project develops "Braille / tactile … space science activities and observing programs that actively engage blind and visually impaired students from elementary grades through introductory college level in space science."

Source: Initiative to Develop Education though Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS)

This webinar produced at Perkins explains specific aspects of environmental obstacles, with adaptation tips.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

Making the home environment safe and well organized; focuses on lighting, glare, contrast, organization, and eliminating hazards; available in English and Spanish.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

This 7-minute video was created by Elina Mullen, Ed.D. and demonstrates different types of equipment for various sports, such as hockey, racquet games, and more.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

This site's state-by-state menu makes it easy to locate, in one place, agency contact information for Accessible Information Materials and National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard(NIMAS) for your U.S. state or territory.

Source: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

Identifies various types of transition assessment, guidelines for conducting an assessment, and criteria for selection of assessment tools.

Source: National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC)

In this PowerPoint presentation, Dr. Mary Zatta talks about bringing a student's educational plan into alignment with state's curricular requirements, with specific examples from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

OSHA standards and procedures for protecting the eyes in the workplace.

Source: ISHN (Industrial Safety & Hygiene News)

Read the full page of resources here, and browse the links below for additional information specific to children who are blind or visually impaired, deafblind, or who have additional disabilities including visual impairment.

Source: Center for Parent Information and Resources (formerly NICHCY)

The NCEO website provides information about alternate assessment, including state policies, publications and other resources, and a section on alternate assessments for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Source: National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, CareerOneStop provides links to career exploration, including self-assessments and employment trends. It also includes sections on Education and Training, Resumes and Interviews, Salary and Benefits, Job Search, and People and Places.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor

AAAS publishes the journal Science, as well as other publications. They have a large number of programs designed to bring science literacy to all. They have resources for businesses, scientists, teachers, and students. One of their many endeavors, Project 2061 has developed highly regarded science curriculum benchmarks. The AAAS signature program is called Entrypoint, providing internship opportunities in science, engineering, math, computer science and some fields of business for students with disabilities. Many program alumni are now working in the science fields.

The American Printing House for the Blind is the world's largest producer of books and products for people who are blind or visually impaired. Founded in 1858, APH is the official supplier of educational materials for visually impaired K-12 students in the U.S.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind

Dr. Jan van Dijk describes his educational approach, including the topics of attachment and the development of communication.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness

Stacy Shafer outlines some of Dr. Lilli Nielsen's recommendations for designing a learning environment for a child with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2005, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Suggestions for creating tactile teaching aids, including clocks, a geometry kit, tactile maps, globe, chemical equation tiles, and more.

Source: Eyeway.org (India)

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