Science Resources

Science teachers of students who are blind or visually impaired will find advice, encouragement, and teaching techniques in this section.

This site includes a list of free and low-cost educational software and an online glossary.

This adaptation of a classic experiment demonstrates how to make chemical reaction/conservation of mass accessible to students who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: Perkins eLearning

Ron Stewart describes the collaboration between Science Access Project and Technology Access Project at Oregon State University in "conducting the research and development of a variety of technologies that focus specifically on access to mathematical and hard science content for the print disabled."

Source: ATHEN (Access Technologists Higher Education Network)

Explains the differences between vision screening, testing, and eye examinations.

Source: Vision First Foundation

TSBVI shares instructional resources; sign up for a password and download the Periodic Table of Elements, Elements Listed by Name, Elements Listed by Atomic Number, PH Scale, Nemeth Code Reference Sheets, and Set Notation.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

Understanding the many risks to our eyes at home and in the garden.

Source: American Academy of Ophthalmology

Interesting features and practical advice on vision care, eye conditions and treatment, glasses, and lenses.

Short videos that give brief overviews about assistive technology in FSDB classrooms, showing how and why the devices support learning. Includes the Braille Notetaker, interactive whiteboards, and Mountbatten braille writer.

This page describes the book Touch the Sun, which allows blind and visually impaired students to experience images of the sun and solar activity by feeling transparent raised textures bonded to the pictures.

Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Includes visual screening importance, guidelines, and procedures.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

This site describes Touch the Universe: A NASA Braille Book of Astronomy, which uses embossed images of planets, nebulae, stars, and galaxies to make it accessible to readers who are blind and visually impaired. The site includes released images, text, videos, Fast Facts, and related links.

Source: HubbleSite

Contains A-Z information on diseases and disorders of the eye, basic eye anatomy, and eye care resources; also available in Spanish.

Source: National Eye Institute (NEI)

Find out more about the history of teaching science at Perkins School for the Blind, including a tactile museum featuring objects from the natural world and science disciplines.

Source: Perkins History Museum—Perkins School for the Blind

An Austin college professor creates an open-access tutorial for physics students.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education

Independence Science provides talking and sensory products to increase accessibility in the science lab. This is a robust website of technological and tactile solutions or experimentation and modeling.

ILAB presents information on speech-accessible tools as well as modified laboratory procedures, which will enable students who are blind or visually impaired to perform chemistry laboratory experiments without sighted assistance.  The site includes information on laboratory tools, experiments, and tactile chemistry.

Future Reflections (2003.

Penny Leigh describes the Multisensory Space Science Kit, developed by South Carolina School of the Deaf and the Blind and NASA. She describes adaptations to teach the proximity between planets, an Alphabet of Space, and a tactile map of the solar system.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Examples of accessible biology lessons are provided by experienced teachers of the visually impaired.

Source: Perkins School for the Blind

In this five-page article, Cary A. Supalo and Thomas E. Mallouk describe inexpensive laboratory adaptations that increase accessibility to experiments and classroom exercises for students who are blind or visually impaired.

Science instructor Sara Larkin uses lesson plans in magnetism, electricity, and sound to demonstrate how inquiry-based learning can be modified for students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

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