Science Resources

Science teachers of students who are blind or visually impaired will find advice, encouragement, and teaching techniques in this section.

This guide describes 28 of the most common birds in North America, with a recording of their voices; includes a listing of different habitats and the birds common to each.

Source: Natural History Education, Science, Technology

Some of the visual skills that need to be evaluated as part of a child's comprehensive vision examination.

Source: Optometrists Network

Bookmark this page for job listings, many of which ask for experience within the blindness community, or services to people with disabilities.

Source: American Council of the Blind (ACB)

Students who are blind should not be excluded from physics courses because of inaccessible textbooks. The modules in this collection present physics concepts in a format that students with visual impairments can read using accessibility tools, such as an audio screen reader and an electronic line-by-line braille display. These modules are intended to supplement and not to replace the physics textbook.

Source: Richard Baldwin

This interactive website is full of practical ideas for hands-on lessons, resources, materials, and more. Subscribe to the blog, ask questions, and share your ideas with an online community of practice of educators interested in making science accessible to students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins eLearning

This section of the interactive website includes information about products and instructional materials for teaching science to students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins School for the Blind

In this webcast, Perkins science teacher Kate Fraser outlines teaching strategies and adaptations to make science lessons and activities accessible to students who are visually impaired. Find even more resources more at the Perkins Accessible Science website.

Source: Webcast, Perkins School for the Blind

"The AccessSTEM website is a space where K-12 teachers, postsecondary educators, and employers learn to make classroom and employment opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) accessible to individuals with disabilities, and share promising practices."

Evolving Universe and Feel the Impact are NASA astronomy modules adapted for students with visual impairments. Both include alternate student texts and tactile graphics cards. The SEE Project develops "Braille / tactile … space science activities and observing programs that actively engage blind and visually impaired students from elementary grades through introductory college level in space science."

Source: Initiative to Develop Education though Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS)

OSHA standards and procedures for protecting the eyes in the workplace.

Source: ISHN (Industrial Safety & Hygiene News)

AAAS publishes the journal Science, as well as other publications. They have a large number of programs designed to bring science literacy to all. They have resources for businesses, scientists, teachers, and students. One of their many endeavors, Project 2061 has developed highly regarded science curriculum benchmarks. The AAAS signature program is called Entrypoint, providing internship opportunities in science, engineering, math, computer science and some fields of business for students with disabilities. Many program alumni are now working in the science fields.

Maylene Bird shares teaching tips on cells, microscopes, diagrams and models, dissecting, and measuring.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

This page has links to various biology lessons, a list of errors and omissions in the Holt Biology Book (2004), and diagrams that can be downloaded to accompany the text.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

This site features two newspaper articles about "small but significant breakthroughs" in science education for students who are blind: Camp Eureka, a natural history camp in Montana; and a dissection class at Colorado Center for the Blind.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Cary Supalo shares his strategies for a positive experience in chemistry classes.  He describes the importance of obtaining materials in alternate formats, note-taking, creating three-dimensional models, and working closely with lab technicians, scribes, and readers.

Source: Future Reflections (2002), National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Maylene Bird provides step-by-step instructions for building cell models for biology, including ideas for organelles and sample cell diagrams.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

Future Reflections (2002).

Bernhard Beck-Winchatz asserts that "there is nothing a blind person could not do as well" in the field of astronomy. He co-developed Touch the Universe – A NASA Braille Book of Astronomy, which makes Hubble Space Telescope images accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

This article explores the pros and cons of surgery, with information about procedures, outcomes, and recovery.

Source: Sacramento Network of Care

This list of common abbreviations may be helpful in interpreting an eye report.

Source: Root Eye Network

An explanation of the elements of an eye examination and what the specialist is evaluating.

Source: American Optometric Association

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