Best Practices Resources

These resources collect material on best practices for teachers and other professionals who work with students who are visually impaired or who have multiple disabilities.

A checklist of safety tips for lighting, furniture, elimination of hazards, use of color contrast, and safety in hallways and stairways.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Key elements of high quality services for multiply handicapped children, and shares examples from a range of service delivery models.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

Treasure Baskets are collections of real objects that encourage a child to explore different sensory characteristics. This article offers suggestions of items to include in the baskets and discusses some of the educational benefits for young children.

Source: Nursery World

This section of the interactive website includes information about products and instructional materials for teaching science to students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins School for the Blind

In this webcast, Perkins science teacher Kate Fraser outlines teaching strategies and adaptations to make science lessons and activities accessible to students who are visually impaired. Find even more resources more at the Perkins Accessible Science website.

Source: Webcast, Perkins School for the Blind

"The AccessSTEM website is a space where K-12 teachers, postsecondary educators, and employers learn to make classroom and employment opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) accessible to individuals with disabilities, and share promising practices."

Outlines Head Start policy and practice for accommodating and integrating children with disabilities into its programs.

Source: HeadStart

This webinar produced at Perkins explains specific aspects of environmental obstacles, with adaptation tips.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

Making the home environment safe and well organized; focuses on lighting, glare, contrast, organization, and eliminating hazards; available in English and Spanish.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Barbara Cheadle's child-rearing advice for parents whose children have visual impairments.

Source: Future Reflections, 2004, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

OSHA standards and procedures for protecting the eyes in the workplace.

Source: ISHN (Industrial Safety & Hygiene News)

Information for people with age-related macular degeneration, their families, caregivers, and professionals.

AAAS publishes the journal Science, as well as other publications. They have a large number of programs designed to bring science literacy to all. They have resources for businesses, scientists, teachers, and students. One of their many endeavors, Project 2061 has developed highly regarded science curriculum benchmarks. The AAAS signature program is called Entrypoint, providing internship opportunities in science, engineering, math, computer science and some fields of business for students with disabilities. Many program alumni are now working in the science fields.

Basic description of nystagmus, FAQs, information for parents of school-age children with the condition.

Stacy Shafer outlines some of Dr. Lilli Nielsen's recommendations for designing a learning environment for a child with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2005, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Susan Boswell and Debbie Gray outline the steps in toilet training, including assessment, physical structure, establishing a routine and communication system, and troubleshooting. A list of children's books about toilet training is included.

Source: Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication-Handicapped Children (TEACCH)

Guidelines for offering practical assistance to people who are blind or visually impaired, including etiquette tips and sighted guide techniques. Available as a PDF.

Source: Community Eye Health Journal

Information about blindness, education and development, independent movement and travel, sports, games, and leisure activities can be found on this site.

This site features two newspaper articles about "small but significant breakthroughs" in science education for students who are blind: Camp Eureka, a natural history camp in Montana; and a dissection class at Colorado Center for the Blind.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

This section of the AFB website includes resources for teachers of braille, resources for parents, a link to DOTS, the newsletter for braille literacy, and a listing of sources of braille materials.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Pages