O&M and Scale Drawing

By Susan LoFranco on Apr 24, 2017

  • The student will be able to measure a shape and then, draw it with the graphics board to scale and discuss the coefficient of scale.

Materials

  • Braille or Large Print Ruler
  • Graph paper - bold or raise lined (full page not 4 quarter)
  • Dots, Markers, Black tape

Procedure

  •  With the student review vocabulary - scale, area, perimeter, map scale.Learning about Scales worksheet
  •  With the student review different scales found on maps;  confirm that student understands the purpose of the scale.  By Googling Scales on Maps and viewing images numerous scales can be found.
  •  Using the students media of choice, change the scale given in the Learning About Scales Worksheet.
  •  To prepare the student for creating their own scale and drawing discuss a route the student takes moving from one classroom to another.  
  •  Next,  discuss how the student thinks the distance could be calculated.  (Answers may include counting steps, using measuring tapes, counting doorways.)
  •  Once a method of calculating the distance between classrooms has been determined, with the student measure out the distance. (Remember to include all turns.)
  •  Record distances using the student's media of choice.
  •  Then, once again, using the Learning About Scales Worksheet, the student should develop a scale that will be used to create a map of the route.  
  •  Lastly, the student, using graph paper, will create a map of the route using the appropriate scale.  The map should include labels of the rooms, hallways, offices, bathrooms, and have the scale included.  
  •  The creation of the map is an opportunity for the student to be creative and descriptive.  After the map is completed the student can use it to confirm it is accurate or ask another student to follow the map to ensure accuracy.  
  •  The student should re-adjust the map as required.

 

Collage of map scale drawings

 

Variations

  • This lesson can be done for numerous routes throughout the building and then extended to to outdoors.  
Read more about: Math, STEM