Transition

A college student who is deafblind due to Usher Syndrome discusses learning ASL and exposure to deaf culture in the classroom.
The author discusses how connections with teachers and friends have impacted his life as an adult who is blind.
A high school student at Perkins School for the Blind offers advice about interacting with people who are visually impaired.
This activity requires students who are blind or visually impaired to direct someone to their house using O&M, work readiness, and independent living skills.
A high school student reflects on the loss of her sight.
Setting up a personal network is a helpful activity for transition-age youth as they prepare to look for a job.
Teaching your child to deal with the unexpected and to solve problems of daily life is a critical transition skill.
A parent shares tips on getting started as an office volunteer shredding paper
A customer service representative who is blind reflects on his first week working at a new job as a senior customer service representative.
Learning how to use free or unstructured time during a break is an important skill for transition and work readiness.
Scavenger hunts are a fun way to address all parts of the Expanded Core Curriculum!
The parent of a young adult who is deafblind discusses details of setting up a recycling program and managing the money earned.
There are 2 sessions included in this training module on transition planning for students with visual impairments and additional disabilities.
The parent of a young adult who is deafblind shares her experience of setting up a project to recycle cans in the community.
An activity to help blind and visually impaired students plan for transition and adult life as they learn about budgeting.
A high school student contemplates what it will be like to graduate from high school and live on her own.
A high school student at Perkins School for the Blind shares her thoughts about moving out of her parents' house.
A college student who is deafblind due to Usher Syndrome discusses his experience with his first phone interview.
McGowan, a parent of a teenager who is deafblind, describes the transition planning process for her son as he began preparing to go from high school to college.
A worker who is blind discusses his experience of being promoted in his job, including the obstacles and successes.
A successful college student shares her tools and tricks on how to start the semester off right - How to Pick Housing.
A high school student with a visual impairment shares her personal experience of being in a school for sighted students.
A college student with deafblindness shares his thoughts on preparing to meet employers.
This interactive activity allows students who are blind or visually impaired to practice interview skills and better understand the employment process.
Use MadLibs to build social skills with students who are blind or visually impaired.
A student in the Secondary Program at Perkins School for the Blind shares his experiences of moving from a mainstream setting to a school for the blind.
High School transition goals and activities for the college-bound student with visual impairments and blindness.
This activity is designed to help students with visual impairments learn about options for watching accessible movies and television.
In this activity, students learn about some of the entry-level jobs that exist in their communities and what these jobs involve.
A successful college student shares her tools and tricks on how to start the semester off right - navigating the college campus.
The mother of a young adult with deafblindness shares tips for families to get organized in the new year.
A successful college student shares her tools and ticks on how to start the semester off right - creating a Disability Services File.
A successful college student shares her tools and tricks on how to start the semester off right - explaining accommodations to professors.
A successful college student shares her tools and tricks on how to start the semester off right - finding accessible digital textbooks.
A successful college student shares her tools and tricks on how to start the semester off right - beginning with class scheduling.
Blind and visually impaired students practice skills necessary to schedule a medical appointment in this hands-on activity.
This activity uses a trip to a business in the student’s community to learn about jobs.
Personal reflections on the value of braille in the workplace and independence
An activity that encourages students who are blind or visually impaired to participate in their IEP goal development.
Learn how to support children and youth with visual impairments through the career education model (career awareness, exploration, preparation, and placement).
A teenager with visual impairments reflects on her first college experience.
A hands-on activity that encourages social skill development as students who are blind or visually impaired use the phone to order a pizza.
Playing games can be a fun way to develop social skills for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, including those with multiple disabilities.
Dr. Wolffe describes the importance of starting very early in a child’s development in order for the student to develop the necessary skills to achieve success.
Learning about the roles of the members of the IEP team are an important step towards self-determination, which is part of the ECC (Expanded Core Curriculum).
These tips for working with clients with low vision will help to optimize visual efficiency and independence.
A student in the Secondary program at Perkins School for the Blind reflects on facing the challenge of mobility.
This activity is designed to help students with vision impairments develop increasing practice and comfort with requesting assistance, in progressively more challenging situations.
The mother of a child who is deafblind reflects on the need to adapt information to one's own child and specific circumstances.
This activity encourages students with special needs to become aware of and think critically about the accommodations they receive at school.

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