Deafblindness Resources

These resources relate specifically to deafblindness (Scout also provides more general resources about multiple disabilities). Students who are deafblind have unique educational challenges, but there are also organizations, communities, and groups that focus on deafblindness. The resources here include material for parents, teachers, and individuals.

Created by a man with deafblindness, this information site is mostly for other people who are deafblind, but includes material for family members and service providers.

Martha Majors, of the Perkins Deafblind Program, defines literacy for students with blindness, deafblindness, or additional disabilities. and explores alignment of the curriculum with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: In Touch, 2008, New England Consortium of Deafblind Projects

A project developed between Penrickton Center for the Blind in Michigan, Perkins School for the Blind, and the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired provides resources and a community of practice around the work of Dr. Lilli Nielsen and Active Learning. The site includes discussion of Active Learning principles, assessment, implementation, materials, equipment, and other events and resources. Active Learning is most effective for those with significant multiple disabilities and in the 0-48 month developmental level. 

ADA creates child-specific adaptations in a model workshop in New York City. They also create guidelines, techniques, and devices that can be replicated in Adaptive Design Centers all over the world. Founder Alex Truesdell is a MacArthur Fellow and tells about her work in this video: https://www.macfound.org/fellows/948/

Source: Adaptive Design Association

This article lists the symptoms of vision loss in older people with developmental disabilities, and discusses the importance of getting appropriate services.

Source: disAbilityNavigator

In this PowerPoint presentation, Dr. Mary Zatta talks about bringing a student's educational plan into alignment with state's curricular requirements, with specific examples from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

Read the full page of resources here, and browse the links below for additional information specific to children who are blind or visually impaired, deafblind, or who have additional disabilities including visual impairment.

Source: Center for Parent Information and Resources (formerly NICHCY)

AADB is a national consumer organization of, by, and for deafblind Americans and their supporters.

The American Printing House for the Blind is the world's largest producer of books and products for people who are blind or visually impaired. Founded in 1858, APH is the official supplier of educational materials for visually impaired K-12 students in the U.S.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind

Based on data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); includes information on visual impairment.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Based on data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); includes information on visual impairment.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

APH maintains program statistics on children with visual impairments, including types of schools/programs in which they are educated, and their preferred learning medium (braille, print, auditory).

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

Assessing vision as part of an early intervention program for infants and children who have additional or multiple disabilities and visual impairment (MDVI).

Source: Scottish Sensory Centre

Validation studies conducted on assessment instruments specific to children with deafblindness are summarized, with recommendations and planning checklist.

Source: Oregon Health & Science University

Focuses on communication and the interpreter's role when assessing the vision of a person who is deafblind; includes tests and techniques for conducting the assessment.

Source: Lea-Test Ltd.

A study of the effect of age-related vision and hearing impairments on health and quality of life. From the academic journal Archives of Ophthalmology in 2006; volume 124, number 10, pages 1465-1470

Source: Archives of Ophthalmology

Ole Mortensen looks at surveys that show how many older people experience vision and hearing loss, and the need for services revealed by these statistics.

Source: European Blind Union

In this 11-page document, Sam Morgan describes biobehavioral states and explains why they are important when working with students with profound disabilities.

Source: Hunter College

This article introduces two ways to classify states of awareness in "individuals with profound disabilities."

Covers a wide range of issues, including demographics, work, daily activities, regional differences and policy issues.

Source: National Research Center for Women and Families

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