Assistive Technology Resources

Assistive technology (AT) includes devices and software used by those with impairments of one type or another. This section lists sources for assistive technology as well as agencies that help set the standards for evaluation of AT, agencies that are helping to bring AT to a wider audience, and information about AT in general. User information and discussion groups may also be found here.

In Touch presents news and information for people who are blind or visually impaired. Peter White's weekly podcast is archived for 30 days. 

Source: BBC, Radio 4

This site includes links to a number of documents on the topic of designing accessible environments, including Addressing Barriers to Blind Pedestrians at Signalized Intersections.

Source: U.S. Access Board Resources

Independence Market is an online resource for products such as canes and directional devices that are available through the National Federation of the Blind.

Source: National Federation for the Blind (NFB)

Irie AT is commited to providing accessible resources for adults and students who have visual impairments. The Irie AT website includes an extensive list by state of funding resources available for AT needs, as well as a resource list for veterans with low vision.  In addition, the more general list "Industry Resources" includes a host of resources available for everything from Guide Dogs to Bookshare to scholarships for students with disabilities.  

The TactiPad is one of the most well-known products, but Irie AT also sells low vision tools.

This list has been created for the purpose of discussing all aspects of the JAWS for Windows screen reader program.

Kurzweil Educational Systems currently offers Kurzweil 1000, Kurzweil 3000 for Windows and Kurzweil 3000 for Macintosh. Product Help is provided through "How To" Videos and educational resources.

A short video that demonstrates how laptops, refreshable braille displays, screen readers, and screen enlargement devices are being used by the blind and visually impaired students at the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind in St. Augustine, Florida.

Source: Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind

A short video that demonstrates how laptops, refreshable braille displays, screen readers, and screen enlargement devices are being used by the blind and visually impaired students at the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind in St. Augustine, Florida.

Source: Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind

Learning Ally (formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic) serves students from kindergarten through college age. A nonprofit volunteer organization, Learning Ally makes textbooks and literature available to student who cannot read standard print because of visual impairment, dyslexia, or other physical disability.

This website is a primary source of information on Active Learning and the sole source of Active Learning equipment authorized by Dr. Lilli Nielsen in North America.

Comprehensive information on low vision, including definitions, information on the visual system, causes of visual impairment, overview of low vision devices, and employment considerations.

Source: International Encyclopedia of Rehabilitation

Description of general, near-, and distance-vision optical devices, nonoptical aids, and instruction in their use.

Source: Family Connect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

Definitions, causes, devices, assessment, and resources on low vision.

Source: California Department of Education

Information on low vision, visual acuity, legal blindness, light perception, light projection, total blindness, and reading with low vision optical devices.

Source: VisionAware

Learn how to adapt a battery-operated toy by creating a switch that allows a child to control its operation. Step-by-step instructions in PDF format.

Source: Alliance for Technology Access

Promotes the use of assistive technology and assistive technology services to enhance the independence of people with disabilities.

These links for teachers whose math students are blind or visually impaired include tips for classroom accommodations, advice for reading math aloud to students, and information about assistive technology.

Source: Equal Access to Software and Information (EASI)

International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI), Overbrook School for the Blind, and The Nippon Foundation collaborated on this teaching methods manual that includes use of the traditional abacus and Nemeth braille code.

Source: A Publication of ON-NET/ICEVI

Collection of videos includes abacus, calculators, low tech math tools, and Nemeth

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

Maxi - Aids is the leading provider of on-line adaptive products for the blind and visually impaired.  The company is owned and operated by individuals who are blind, deaf, or autistic.

The following description of products offered is from the Maxi-Aids website:

MaxiAids is the Leader in Blind & Low Vision Devices for Independent Living

We offer the lowest prices on the largest selection of low vision products for the blind and visually impaired. Our low vision devices include Braille items, canes, calendars, talking watches, computer products, magnifiers, music players/recorders, specialty sunglasses, and much more. MaxiAids has tools for the blind and those with low vision. We have everything you need to help you live a more active, healthy and independent lifestyle.

Numerous items have been reviewed on the Perkins Accessible Science Website including adapted measuring cups, liquid level indicators, and adapted measuring spoons. 

 

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