Assistive Technology Resources

Assistive technology (AT) includes devices and software used by those with impairments of one type or another. This section lists sources for assistive technology as well as agencies that help set the standards for evaluation of AT, agencies that are helping to bring AT to a wider audience, and information about AT in general. User information and discussion groups may also be found here.

Subscribers receive Solutions, a bi-monthly online newletters on new assistive technology, and full access to the comprehensive Resource Directory of AT products. Non-subscribers can search the directory with less detail.

Entitled "Teaching Computer Skills To Children with Visual Impairments: A Concept-Based Approach," the Carroll Center lists the computer skills a student needs to be fully in command of a PC and its assistive technology.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

You'll find a large collection of resources on the school's Assistive Technology Center page.  There are Curriculum Guides, checklists for evaluating a student's computer and AT skills, JAWS exercises for Internet searching, and more.

Source: California School for the Blind (CSB)

A landing page of links to current research on the topic of math education and math accessibility.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

In this primer on the Universal Design for Learning framework, Dr. Richard Jackson argues that creating a curriculum that accommodates students with low-incidence disabilities is beneficial to all learners.

Source: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

To learn more about the various devices available for deafblind communication, including communication with hearing and/or sighted individuals, view this tutorial from Perkins and Perkins Products.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

To learn more about the various devices available for deafblind communication, including communication with hearing and/or sighted individuals, view this tutorial from Perkins and Perkins Products.

Source: Perkins eLearning

The Department of Justice shares questions for evaluating the accessibility software programs most used by its employees and many businesses.

Source: United States Department of Justice

The Department of Justice shares questions for evaluating the accessibility software programs most used by its employees and many businesses.

Source: United States Department of Justice

The CEC's Division on Visual Impairment and Deafblindness advances the education of children and youth who have visual impairments or deafblindness. Browse selected articles and position papers here.

Source: Council for Exceptional Children

Dolphin is the manufacturer of the SuperNova screen reader products, the Dolphin Guide to talking computing, and several alt-format accessibility tools

Duxbury software is used by the world's leading braille publishers. Their website's Online discussion forums provide valuable information regarding the user experience.

Source: Duxbury Systems

APH offers a wide range of products for parents and professionals to use in the education of young children, including assessment tools, curricula, and instructional materials.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

The free downloadable Earth+ software "makes NASA satellite photos and data accessible to blind students … using sound cues about the features in the picture."  Included are lessons on hurricane tracking and hurricane prediction

Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Podcaster Colleen Connor kicked off her program with this explanation of accessibility settings for PCs. This is an easy to follow-along-while-listening approach to finding your best accessibility settings (23 mins).

Source: Blind Inspiration Cast

Tutorials on the accessibility features of the standard Microsoft Windows operating system and Office Suite, Macintosh Tiger and Leopard systems, as well as major text-to-speech and speech-to-text products.

Research resources and information about blindness in the arts, information technology, and computing.

Source: ECO

NCAM conducted a three-year study project, which ended in 2007, "to research and document effective practices for providing meaningful descriptions of non-text science content for postsecondary students or scientists who have visual impairments or are blind." The team will create a recommended practices report and a training manual.

Source: National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM)

This one-hour webcast features a panel discussion on "electronic accessibility to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics classes"; includes transcript.

Source: National Center on Disability and Access to Education (NCDAE)

Paths to Literacy collects papers and presentations on the topic of technology and emerging literacy.  You will also find here information on the latest applications for iPad and other iOS devices that engage students who are visually impaired in the learning process.  For more topics on technology for literacy, visit the Paths to Literacy technology section.

Source: Paths to Literacy

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