Common Core / Curriculum

The Core Curriculum refers to the body of knowledge and skills that is taught to students in school. For children whose only disability is visual impairment, this is generally an academic curriculum, with adaptations. For students with additional disabilities, the curriculum will still be aligned with the general curriculum, but with more significant modifications.

Because the basic core curriculum does not include the special skills that students who are blind or visually impaired must be taught, the Expanded Core Curriculum is an essential part of a student's education.

A look at educational settings, curriculum, and some of the challenges in educating children with visual impairments

Source: National Federation of the Blind

Marc Krizack describes the work of Dr. Dennis Fantin, a blind biophysicist who developed "a basic set of three-dimensional chemical and biological models to be used as educational aids for blind students enrolled in college courses in the physical and biological sciences."

Source: Disability World

Students who are blind should not be excluded from physics courses because of inaccessible textbooks. The modules in this collection present physics concepts in a format that students with visual impairments can read using accessibility tools, such as an audio screen reader and an electronic line-by-line braille display. These modules are intended to supplement and not to replace the physics textbook.

Source: Richard Baldwin

Martha Majors, of the Perkins Deafblind Program, defines literacy for students with blindness, deafblindness, or additional disabilities. and explores alignment of the curriculum with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: In Touch, 2008, New England Consortium of Deafblind Projects

The English title is “Curricular Adaptations and Creation of Services for Multi-handicapped Blind Persons in Chile”; in Spanish.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

This site's state-by-state menu makes it easy to locate, in one place, agency contact information for Accessible Information Materials and National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard(NIMAS) for your U.S. state or territory.

Source: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

The APH report was conducted in 2005-2006 to analyze mathematics research and studies that meet the criteria for evidence-based practice.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

Maylene Bird shares teaching tips on cells, microscopes, diagrams and models, dissecting, and measuring.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

This page has links to various biology lessons, a list of errors and omissions in the Holt Biology Book (2004), and diagrams that can be downloaded to accompany the text.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

"...[D]escribes the variety of state infrastructures and programs ... that serve children and youth who are blind or visually impaired. Information was collected through a brief survey distributed to all state education agencies...."  Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: National Association of State Director of Special Education, Inc. (NASDSE)

The braille section of the Paths to Literacy site offers an overview, instructional strategies, pre-braille, tactile graphics, technology for braille readers, sources of print/braille books, tools for writing braille, braille production, and brailler repair. Users may post content, and there is also a forum for questions and answers related to braille literacy.

Source: Paths to Literacy

Maylene Bird provides step-by-step instructions for building cell models for biology, including ideas for organelles and sample cell diagrams.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

A discussion of Smarter Balanced and Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career (PARCC) field tests that align with Common Core State Standards.

Source: National Federation of the Blind

APH provides links to resources with information and guidance in implementing the Common Core State Standards.

Source: American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. (APH)

Tara Mason, TVI, M.Ed explains the elements that make the Common Core State Standards different from previous state standards, and the challenges they present for students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins eLearning

The Common Core Toolkit for Parents and Families is a collection of materials and resources that will help parents and families understand the New York State Common Core implementation.  It is not specifically designed for students with visual impairments.

Source: Engage NY

Phil Hatlen defends the right of students who are blind or visually impaired to have different educational needs than their sighted peers.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

A list of suggested accessibility adaptations compiled by the Statewide Vision Resource Centre (Victoria, Australia).

A landing page of links to current research on the topic of math education and math accessibility.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

In this primer on the Universal Design for Learning framework, Dr. Richard Jackson argues that creating a curriculum that accommodates students with low-incidence disabilities is beneficial to all learners.

Source: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

Pages